Influenza: Information & Resources

U.S. public health officials continue to monitor and respond to the spread of H1N1. The resources on this page can help you find out more about influenza, including seasonal flu and pandemic flu.

Latest News

New Report Reconfirms H1N1 Vaccine Safety
The National Vaccine Advisory Committee (NVAC) established the H1N1 Vaccine Safety Risk Assessment Working Group (H1N1 VSRAWG) to conduct independent, rapid reviews of available safety monitoring data for the 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccines. Since the vaccine was made available, the committee has met five times to review data from the federal vaccine safety monitoring systems.

The H1N1 vaccine is widely available. As of Dec. 25, 2009, 74.7 million doses of inactivated H1N1 and 19.4 million doses of live attenuated H1N1 vaccine were distributed.

The report concluded that no serious adverse events (SAE) have been attributed to the H1N1 vaccines in the clinical trials to date. In addition, comparison of reporting in the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System of SAE after seasonal and other similar vaccines and H1N1 influenza vaccines generally show similar levels of SAE.

For information on this report and other related studies please visit www.hhs.gov.

Newest APHA Flu Resources

Preparing for a Swine Flu Outbreak, commentary by Dr. Georges C. Benjamin, APHA Executive Director, which appeared in The Washington Times on October 4, 2009.

AJPH October 2009 Supplement, Influenza Preparedness and Response Articles in this special issue of the American Journal of Public Health outline the needs of vulnerable populations during an influenza pandemic, including children, people with disabilities and low-income communities.

CCDM cover

Free influenza chapter from CCDM
Read the free chapter on influenza from the 19th edition of APHA's Control of Communicable Diseases Manual, with information on identification, mode of transmission and more. CCDM flu chapter (PDF)

Free influenza studies from AJPH
Access nearly 200 studies on influenza from the American Journal of Public Health for free.